Potatoes form underground on the roots of the potato plant

Potatoes are tubers which form on the end of underground stems

Potatoes are tubers which form on the end of underground stems

The part of the potato plant that we eat grows underground on the plant's roots. Above ground there are leaves, flowers, and fruit which we do not eat, and which are in fact poisonous. 

Potatoes have small buds, called 'eyes', and new plants grow from these, not from the seeds of the fruit. Potatoes are tubers which form on the end of underground stems.

Potato farmers plant potato 'eyes' in ploughed and fertilised paddocks. After about 100 days, 15 or 20 potatoes have grown on each plant.

A potato harvester digs up the potatoes

A potato harvester digs up the potatoes

The potatoes are dug out using a machine called a potato harvester, which lifts the potatoes out of the soil. Then the potatoes are sorted and packed into sacks and boxes.

Potatoes are the fourth largest crop in the world. 

Eating potatoes

Potatoes can be made into 'chips' or 'french fries' (Wikipedia)

Potatoes can be made into 'chips' or 'french fries' (Wikipedia)

Potatoes can be cooked in many different ways (boiled, baked, fried) and can also be frozen and dried. Potatoes are a good food, as they contain protein, calcium, vitamins C, B and D as well as niacin.

History of potatoes

The potato plant is a native of South America. Spanish explorers took the plants back to Europe 400 years ago. The British brought potatoes to Australia when they started their colony here in 1788.

There are more than 4000 different kinds of potatoes

Go here to read about potato chips

http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/question579.htm

Watch a video about potato growing