Plants take water from the soil through their roots. The water contains the nutrients (the food) the plants need to grow. The water moves up through the plant to the leaves, carrying nutrients to all parts of the plant where they are needed. 

Small holes on the backs of leaves are called stomata © iStock 2016

Small holes on the backs of leaves are called stomata © iStock 2016

Plants then release water vapour into the atmosphere through thousands of small holes (called stomata) on the backs of their leaves. This process is called transpiration. 

Stomata also let air get in and out of the plant. 

As water evaporates from the leaves, more water is pulled up from the roots.

Only about 1%  of the water taken up by the plant is actually used in the process known as photosynthesis. The rest of the of it goes out into the air as water vapour.

Photosynthesis is the way  plants use the sun's energy, water and carbon dioxide to make food.

Did you know?
A big tree can give off about 150 000 litres of water a year. The water vapour released from plants goes into the air and becomes part of the water cycle.

Read the kidcyber page about the water cycle