Olympic boxing

Men and women compete in Olympic boxing events. The enclosure where they box is called the ring.

They box in bouts of four rounds. Each round lasts two minutes, and there is a break of one minute in between.

The two boxers in the ring wear padded gloves and can only hit each other in certain parts of the upper body. For protection, boxers wear safety headgear and mouth pieces.

The rules of boxing

A referee is in the ring with the boxers. The boxers can lose points if they do not do what the referee tells them. Judges watch the bout and award points to the boxers for how well they box and how well they obey all the rules. If a boxer is warned three times about breaking the rules by the referee, the boxer can be disqualified.

There are ten groups of male boxers who are grouped according to their weight. The lightest men are in a group called Light Flyweight, (46 -49 kilograms) and the heaviest men are in the group called Super Heavyweight. (91 + kilograms)

There are three groups for female boxers, also according to weight. The lightest females are Flyweight and the heaviest Middle weight (69 - 75 kilograms)

Did you know?

Boxing began way back in 688 B.C. in Greece. It was an event in the Ancient Olympic Games.

History of boxing

Boxing was introduced as an Olympic sport at the ancient games of 688 BC. Boxers wrapped their fists with leather straps and wore protective headgear. The boxers fought until one dropped or admitted defeat. The boxer admitting defeat raised his fist in the air to indicate that he'd had enough.

In Roman times, boxers used gloves studded with metal spikes, and fights often ended in the death of one of the boxers. When the Roman Empire fell, boxing disappeared from recorded history.

Boxing matches have always attracted many spectators. © Getty images

Boxing matches have always attracted many spectators. © Getty images

The next recorded boxing match was organised by a British Duke in168; it was a bout between the Duke's butler (servant) and the Duke's butcher. In 1867 modern boxing began with the rules made up by the Marquis of Queensberry. These rules, changed slightly, are still followed today.

Read about Olympic boxing

http://www.olympic.org/boxing

http://www.olympic.org/boxing-equipment-and-history?tab=equipment

Read more about boxing and famous boxers

http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0771584.html